Why You Should Be Using Google Tag Manager

People who are familiar with Google Analytics, or most website analytics services know that there is a great wealth of information that can be gained through these powerful tools. However, how do you answer questions you have about your website and its users, when they can’t be found on the traditional analytics platform? That is where Google Tag Manager comes in, an accessible way to track essentially any user action on your website. As you’ll read below, this free tool by Google allows you to turn your agency’s analytics service into something much more.

How does Google Tag Manager work?

Per Google, Google Tag Manager (GTM) “offers simple, yet powerful tag management solutions to help small businesses and large enterprises launch programs faster.” What this means, is GTM can do a lot. Similar to Google Analytics, GTM interacts with your website similar to that of Google Analytics, via a code snippet in your site’s code. Now, once installed, site managers can implement tags via a variety of what GTM calls “triggers” or user actions, in order to now track these actions within their Google Analytics.

 

Prior to GTM, a site manager needed to hard code each action into the source code, making updates to tags cumbersome and time consuming, and restricted who could implement said tags. The types of tags are endless. You can track what button a users clicks and where, at what point on the page, or when they click the button. You can track how far a user scrolls on your site. You can even track how much of a YouTube a user watched on your website, all with a couple simple tags.

What are Google Tag Manager applications?

GTM can be used for much more than just on-site tag implementation. For one, it can be used to install most remarketing and data collection pixels. This can add in some much desired efficiency when setting up new clients and new campaigns. With support for almost all 3rd party data collection companies such as Salesforce, DoubleClick (DFA), Nielsen, Criteo, Facebook, Twitter and many more, GTM can serve as an easy way to get 3rd party code snippets on your clients’ websites without going through the site manager or web developer.

 

What can we learn from Google Tag Manager?

With the enormous integration capability, and the ability to track most on-site user actions, the possibilities of what GTM can do are close to endless. By adding a more complex data collection strategy to your analytics, advertisers can create more accurate and more complex media strategies, more accurately predict user behavior, and provide clients and agencies alike a better idea of how effective their marketing is.

Using Google Tag Manager at every point of a campaign can teach us more than ever, and allows for faster optimization and more efficient use of client hours and time. How does your company use GTM? For more information on Google Tag Manager, or if you want to chat with us about how you can leverage GTM to better your company’s campaigns, shoot us an email by clicking the contact us button below.

People who are familiar with Google Analytics, or most website analytics services know that there is a great wealth of information that can be gained through these powerful tools. However, how do you answer questions you have about your website and its users, when they can’t be found on the traditional analytics platform? That is where Google Tag Manager comes in, an accessible way to track essentially any user action on your website. As you’ll read below, this free tool by Google allows you to turn your agency’s analytics service into something much more.

How does Google Tag Manager work?

Per Google, Google Tag Manager (GTM) “offers simple, yet powerful tag management solutions to help small businesses and large enterprises launch programs faster.” What this means, is GTM can do a lot. Similar to Google Analytics, GTM interacts with your website similar to that of Google Analytics, via a code snippet in your site’s code. Now, once installed, site managers can implement tags via a variety of what GTM calls “triggers” or user actions, in order to now track these actions within their Google Analytics.

 

Prior to GTM, a site manager needed to hard code each action into the source code, making updates to tags cumbersome and time consuming, and restricted who could implement said tags. The types of tags are endless. You can track what button a users clicks and where, at what point on the page, or when they click the button. You can track how far a user scrolls on your site. You can even track how much of a YouTube a user watched on your website, all with a couple simple tags.

What are Google Tag Manager applications?

GTM can be used for much more than just on-site tag implementation. For one, it can be used to install most remarketing and data collection pixels. This can add in some much desired efficiency when setting up new clients and new campaigns. With support for almost all 3rd party data collection companies such as Salesforce, DoubleClick (DFA), Nielsen, Criteo, Facebook, Twitter and many more, GTM can serve as an easy way to get 3rd party code snippets on your clients’ websites without going through the site manager or web developer.

 

What can we learn from Google Tag Manager?

With the enormous integration capability, and the ability to track most on-site user actions, the possibilities of what GTM can do are close to endless. By adding a more complex data collection strategy to your analytics, advertisers can create more accurate and more complex media strategies, more accurately predict user behavior, and provide clients and agencies alike a better idea of how effective their marketing is.

Using Google Tag Manager at every point of a campaign can teach us more than ever, and allows for faster optimization and more efficient use of client hours and time. How does your company use GTM? For more information on Google Tag Manager, or if you want to chat with us about how you can leverage GTM to better your company’s campaigns, shoot us an email by clicking the contact us button below.

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